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gjmueller:

The glue that really holds a school together — and that reformers ignore

In the era of “big data,” it can be easy to forget the importance of the human connection in certain enterprises, including the education of children. School reformers have set up funding programs that are competitive rather than collaborative, and evaluation systems don’t pay attention to collaboration and school culture. In the face of all of this, here is a post that talks about the importance of relationships between teachers and between teachers and administrators. After all, these connections are really what hold a school together.

image via flickr:CC | Sam_Catch

gjmueller:

The glue that really holds a school together — and that reformers ignore

In the era of “big data,” it can be easy to forget the importance of the human connection in certain enterprises, including the education of children. School reformers have set up funding programs that are competitive rather than collaborative, and evaluation systems don’t pay attention to collaboration and school culture. In the face of all of this, here is a post that talks about the importance of relationships between teachers and between teachers and administrators. After all, these connections are really what hold a school together.

image via flickr:CC | Sam_Catch

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math-girl:

Also, I have a student who keeps saying things like, “You’re confusing me,” or “You’re going to confuse us.”

I literally don’t think a student has ever said that to me before this student, in my 2 years of tutoring, 3 years of observing, 1 year of student teaching and 1+ year of my own teaching….

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gjmueller:

What Is Personalized Learning?

The prevailing enthusiasm for personalized learning has obscured a fundamental question: How should it be defined?

gjmueller:

What Is Personalized Learning?

The prevailing enthusiasm for personalized learning has obscured a fundamental question: How should it be defined?

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Has anyone else noticed that February 2015 is the perfect month?

muirin007:

themaskednegro:

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I actually let out a pleased little squeak when I saw this because ohhh man, that is beautiful.

(via missdunlop)

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micdotcom:

Why everyone should vaccinate — in 3 stunning charts 

This is what it looks like when a public health agency does a mic drop.

On Monday, Vox unearthed some charts that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention put together back in 2011 to illustrate the efficacy of vaccines. As they say, the numbers speak for themselves.

Why vaccination is so important | Follow micdotcom

(via gjmueller)

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gjmueller:

How to use feedback to your advantage

As a teacher, you will certainly be the recipient of some negative feedback, solicited or otherwise. The comments may focus in on your teaching style, how well you communicate, whether a child likes you, etc. Even if the remark was delivered with constructive intent, you may resent the experience and develop a negative view of a parent, child or administrator.
It is important to remember that there is nothing to be gained from harboring negative thoughts. Almost every form of criticism can teach us something powerful about ourselves. The next time that someone approaches you with some unwanted feedback consider doing the following…

image via flickr:CC | banlon1964

gjmueller:

How to use feedback to your advantage

As a teacher, you will certainly be the recipient of some negative feedback, solicited or otherwise. The comments may focus in on your teaching style, how well you communicate, whether a child likes you, etc. Even if the remark was delivered with constructive intent, you may resent the experience and develop a negative view of a parent, child or administrator.

It is important to remember that there is nothing to be gained from harboring negative thoughts. Almost every form of criticism can teach us something powerful about ourselves. The next time that someone approaches you with some unwanted feedback consider doing the following

image via flickr:CC | banlon1964

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gjmueller:

It is Time to Re-think Teacher Time

If a kid takes a 50-minute assessment, how much time should his teacher take to offer suggestions for improvement? What about analyzing what the next lesson ought to remediate and what it ought to extend?
Consider that this teacher has 125 students, all at different levels, spread across three different courses, each with a different curriculum guide. Now how long?
Oh, and each student is working on a complex research challenge, designed to meet both their academic and personal interests and needs. The class is wrestling with grammar and spelling lessons, too. How much time to plan for that?

gjmueller:

It is Time to Re-think Teacher Time

If a kid takes a 50-minute assessment, how much time should his teacher take to offer suggestions for improvement? What about analyzing what the next lesson ought to remediate and what it ought to extend?

Consider that this teacher has 125 students, all at different levels, spread across three different courses, each with a different curriculum guide. Now how long?

Oh, and each student is working on a complex research challenge, designed to meet both their academic and personal interests and needs. The class is wrestling with grammar and spelling lessons, too. How much time to plan for that?

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"It’s the warmth of mathematics, warming your heart."

Calculus teacher in response to a student commenting that the room was warm (via mathprofessorquotes)

I want to remember this and use it in work one day….. #teacherambitions

(via missdunlop)

(via missdunlop)

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teachingfeelslike:

When I make a mistake while writing on the board and the students absolutely lose their minds over it.

teachingfeelslike:

When I make a mistake while writing on the board and the students absolutely lose their minds over it.

(via missdunlop)

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gjmueller:

Is It Time to Rethink How We Grade Participation?

“I realized what I really care about is getting students engaged with the content. So, I started thinking of different ways students could demonstrate course engagement: coming to class, completing assigned homework, actively participating in group work, making use of office hours, getting tutoring at the learning center, joining online discussions, offering quality comments in class, offering written comments (submitted to the teacher with the option of remaining anonymous), submitting questions electronically. I decided not to grade participation but to reward engagement.”

image via flickr:CC | US Department of Education

gjmueller:

Is It Time to Rethink How We Grade Participation?

“I realized what I really care about is getting students engaged with the content. So, I started thinking of different ways students could demonstrate course engagement: coming to class, completing assigned homework, actively participating in group work, making use of office hours, getting tutoring at the learning center, joining online discussions, offering quality comments in class, offering written comments (submitted to the teacher with the option of remaining anonymous), submitting questions electronically. I decided not to grade participation but to reward engagement.”

image via flickr:CC | US Department of Education

(via coordinatingcardigans)

Link

teachmoments:

heyteach:

I waited fourteen years to do something that I should have done my first year of teaching: shadow a student for a day. It was so eye-opening that I wish I could go back to every class of students I ever had right now and change a minimum of ten things – the layout, the lesson plan, the checks for understanding. Most of it!

The author’s key takeaways:

  1. Students sit all day, and sitting is exhausting.
  2. High school students are sitting passively and listening during approximately 90% of their classes.
  3. You feel a little bit like a nuisance all day long.

The whole post is worth reading. She reflects on what she would do differently in the classroom to address her three takeaways.

This is totally important.

(via gjmueller)

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mixedupdays:

Today I needed something to get the kids excited, so my class bear disappeared again. He does this now and then and usually leaves a letter with hints as to his whereabouts, but this time I tried something a bit different. I came up with a sentence that had exactly 26 characters, then wrote out the sentence letter by letter on colorful cards. On the back of each card I wrote a name and a math problem to solve, tailored to that specific child’s ability level, with the answers in order from 1 to 26. Then I put the cards in a little clear box and set the box on the bear’s desk, with a “Do not open until after lunch” note.

The kids were WILD to open that box! Once I did, I was just terribly confused about the cards inside…what could they mean? Well, they had names on them….the kids couldn’t wait to get their own card. Then we brainstormed. The first idea was that the cards were the alphabet and should go in order. So we tried this but almost immediately everyone realized that we were missing some letters and had doubles of others. That wasn’t it!

Next, the students decided that the letters must make words, so we spent a few minutes trying to rearrange our letters. Some groups came up with several words but nothing that told us where the bear went. Hmmm.

Just when I was about to hint that hey, there are MATH problems on the cards, maybe that had something to do with it, one student suddenly shrieked out that HIS math problem’s answer was 12, his friend’s was 13, and another friend’s was 14… quick everyone, solve your math problem!

They were thrilled, just thrilled, when we got the letters in order by number and it made a sentence! Leo the bear was in the office! We marched down there and the kind secretaries returned him (apparently he had been most helpful all morning).

Once we returned to the room, the students spent the rest of math time creating their own codes, and boy did some of them come up with some pretty complicated equations. This was so much fun, and just what I needed today…I was so pleased with their problem-solving, and I can’t wait to do it again with a different code!

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gjmueller:

7 Tips to kick your bad eLearning design habits
Embiggen here
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Chris Lonsdale TedX talk

Chris Lonsdale TedX talk (How to learn any language in six months)

5 principles and 7 actions generalised for learning anything.

5 principles

  1. Focus on content that is relevant to you (give problem then teach the ‘tools’ then the tools are relevant).
  2. Use your learning to communicate/solve problems straight away
  3. When you first understand the message, you will unconsciously acquire the language (comprehensible input)
  4. Physiological training. If you can’t hear it, you’re not going to understand it. If you can’t understand it you’re not going to learn it.
  5. Psycho-pyhsilogical state matters. Happy, relaxed, curious, tolerant of ambiguity.

7 actions

  1. Listen a lot. Doesn’t matter if you understand it or not.
  2. Focus on getting the meaning first (before the details)
  3. Start mixing. How many different things can you do with what you already have?
  4. Focus on the core: the most commonly used methods.
  5. Get a learning parent. Give the student a safe environment for confidence by understanding and reframing correctly what the student is doing. Talk with language the student understands. Someone interested in you as a person. 4 rules: 1. Works hard to understand what you are saying. 2. Does not correct mistakes. 3. Confirms understanding by using correct language. 4. Uses methods the learner knows.
  6. Copy the face
  7. Direct connect to mental images

Changes I could implement:

  1. Allow students to be creative. Get them to invent questions with methods they have already learned. Encourage them to think about how many different problems they could solve with what they have already learned.
  2. Be a ‘learning parent’ for students. Consider ad follow the 4 rules listed above.
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gjmueller:

5 Better Ways to Say ‘I Don’t Know’ in the Classroom

Do you allow students to answer a question with the response “I don’t know” in the classroom? Perhaps you should consider no longer allowing that phrase and instead offering up these five other ways that might get students thinking a bit more.

gjmueller:

5 Better Ways to Say ‘I Don’t Know’ in the Classroom

Do you allow students to answer a question with the response “I don’t know” in the classroom? Perhaps you should consider no longer allowing that phrase and instead offering up these five other ways that might get students thinking a bit more.

(via math-girl)