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Coordinates and straight lines resource

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matthen:

Unrolling these circles gives fills a triangle with base 2 π r and height r (where r is the radius of the filled disk). Such a triangle has area π r2. This does not serve as a complete proof for why this is the area of a circle, but can give you some intuition for why it should be. [code]

matthen:

Unrolling these circles gives fills a triangle with base 2 π r and height r (where r is the radius of the filled disk). Such a triangle has area π r2. This does not serve as a complete proof for why this is the area of a circle, but can give you some intuition for why it should be. [code]

(via mindfuckmath)

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from-student-to-teacher:

Here are some great ‘sentence starters’ to use during problem solving discussions.Pic from http://teachr.co/Y5acdJ

from-student-to-teacher:

Here are some great ‘sentence starters’ to use during problem solving discussions.

Pic from http://teachr.co/Y5acdJ

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missdunlop:

slavetothedetail:

missdunlop

slavetothedetail this is amazing! <3 thank you :)

missdunlop:

slavetothedetail:

missdunlop

slavetothedetail this is amazing! <3 thank you :)

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gjmueller:

Helping Students to Be Comfortable with NOT Knowing [ACTIVITY]

If we aren’t “comfortable with not knowing”, there’s no chance that we will ever truly embrace questioning because questioning is an inherently vulnerable act — particularly in environments where being successful is synonymous with “having the right answer.” So I whipped up a handout that I plan to use whenever we are studying a new topic.

Keep reading about how to try this activity!

gjmueller:

Helping Students to Be Comfortable with NOT Knowing [ACTIVITY]

If we aren’t “comfortable with not knowing”, there’s no chance that we will ever truly embrace questioning because questioning is an inherently vulnerable act — particularly in environments where being successful is synonymous with “having the right answer.” So I whipped up a handout that I plan to use whenever we are studying a new topic.

Keep reading about how to try this activity!

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The educators: Jo Boaler

(From Radio 4. The educators 7/8).

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04gw6rh

  • www.joboaler.com
  • Challenges the idea that only some kids can ever be good at maths.
  • Need good teaching because poor teaching turns off students.
  • Believes in bringing real mathematics into the classroom.
  • A mathematician first needs to be able to pose a good question.
  • Many more kids are engaged when they are involved in a real question.
  • Myth: To be good at maths you have to be fast at maths.
  • Speed isn’t important deep understanding is important.
  • When students are explaining mathematics they are learning ‘reasoning’.
  • "We’re developing a skill set that will allow us to solve anything."
  • It’s not about “fake real world applications”.
  • Let kids come up with the methods.
  • Parents: If you struggled with maths, or didn’t like maths at school, don’t share that with your children - that will cause their achievement to decline.
  • The importance of mistakes. Mistakes change our brains. Brain growth happens when you’re struggling. If you’re not failing, you’re not learning.
  • Referred to: http://www.curriculum.org/secretariat/SheaNumbers.pdf

What I could do differently…

  • Make students feel safe about making mistakes.
  • Try to introduce a few more problems that allow students to think for themselves, develop a method and then explain that method. One example: Get someone to think of three numbers and then give you the sum of each pair. Can you work out what the original numbers were?
  • Give more work they can take to any level.
  • Need structures to disseminate good practice in England for professional development.
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teachnologies:

24 Questions for Student Reflection
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mentalflossr:

Little-Known Punctuation Marks for National Punctuation Day
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gjmueller:

Helping Students Find Purpose and Appreciation for School
image via flickr:CC | mrsdkrebs
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gjmueller:

7 Questions to Ask Parents at the Beginning of the Year
What do you see as your child’s greatest strengths or skills? Tell me about a time when you saw your child demonstrating these skills.
Next June, what do you hope your child says about his/her experience in school this year? What’s the story you hope he/she would tell?
What was your experience like in this grade? How do you remember that year of school?
What are your fears or concerns about your child in this year of school?
How and when would you like me to be in touch with you this year? What do you hope I’d communicate with you about?
Is there anything else you can tell me about your child that you think would help me support his/her learning?
Is there a question you hope I’ll ask you about your child?

image via flickr:CC | Innovation_School

gjmueller:

7 Questions to Ask Parents at the Beginning of the Year

  1. What do you see as your child’s greatest strengths or skills? Tell me about a time when you saw your child demonstrating these skills.
  2. Next June, what do you hope your child says about his/her experience in school this year? What’s the story you hope he/she would tell?
  3. What was your experience like in this grade? How do you remember that year of school?
  4. What are your fears or concerns about your child in this year of school?
  5. How and when would you like me to be in touch with you this year? What do you hope I’d communicate with you about?
  6. Is there anything else you can tell me about your child that you think would help me support his/her learning?
  7. Is there a question you hope I’ll ask you about your child?

image via flickr:CC | Innovation_School

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itsssnix:

Can I just repeat this to anyone who is planning on being a teacher/student teaching/beginning to teach?

You are not your favorite teacher.

Most of us, if we were sitting around a living room, would be able to talk a lot about our absolute favorite teachers. We’d hear all kinds of stories that…

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(Source: mindfuckmath, via missdunlop)

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I like the term “extreme learner”. I like that it is diferent from “gifted”.

(Source: gjmueller)

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gjmueller:

Repeated Practice May Not Make You an Expert

With apologies to Malcolm Gladwell, new research finds that deliberate practice may not have nearly as much influence in building expertise as once thought.
In the new study, psychological scientist Brooke Macnamara, Ph.D., of Princeton University, and colleagues offer a dissenting view, suggesting that the amount of practice accumulated over time does not seem to play a huge role in accounting for individual differences in skill or performance.

gif via erdal inci

gjmueller:

Repeated Practice May Not Make You an Expert

With apologies to Malcolm Gladwell, new research finds that deliberate practice may not have nearly as much influence in building expertise as once thought.

In the new study, psychological scientist Brooke Macnamara, Ph.D., of Princeton University, and colleagues offer a dissenting view, suggesting that the amount of practice accumulated over time does not seem to play a huge role in accounting for individual differences in skill or performance.

gif via erdal inci